About the MRWC

Recognizing the critical need to protect the natural resources of the Missouri River headwaters, state weed coordinators from Colorado, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming and other interested parties began the process of forming what would come to be known as the Missouri River Watershed Coalition in 2005. From the beginning, MRWC members acknowledged the need to consolidate resources, share information, and avoid duplication of efforts in the region. In 2012, Kansas became the seventh MRWC state.

The makeup of the MRWC is a demonstration of the strength that can be built by seating local and state agencies, concerned citizens groups, tribal nations, and federal regulatory agencies as collaborative managers, investigators, and decision makers. Further, having many of the highly-invested parties charged with invasive plant management and regulation of river resources represented in the MRWC membership has helped to promote inter-state and regional communication and will streamline projects, research, and outreach efforts at the watershed level. Finally, bringing managers, academics, and policy makers to the table ensures that research conducted by the MRWC has practical management applications, and the results are shared with other concerned parties throughout the Watershed, and beyond.

Financial resources are currently inadequate to effectively manage invasive species in many of the MRWC states. Increased funding to natural resource managers, county weed districts, and federal and state agencies, and improved efficiency and organization of grassroots efforts are critical to implementing viable weed management programs in the Watershed. With shrinking state budgets, the national economic downturn, predicted geographic expansion of well-established invasive species due to climate change, and the potential for many new invasions on the horizon, the need to cooperate and pool limited resources on the watershed level has never been more necessary.

Increased funding to natural resource managers, county weed districts, and federal and state agencies, and improved efficiency and organization of grassroots efforts are critical to implementing viable weed management programs in the Watershed. With shrinking state budgets, the national economic downturn, predicted geographic expansion of well-established invasive species due to climate change, and the potential for many new invasions on the horizon, the need to cooperate and pool limited resources on the watershed level has never been more necessary.